Swedish Semla

Swedish semla: Fat Tuesday bun

Do you want to become Swedish? Then eating semla on the designated day (called fettisdagen) is a good start. It’s a cardamom bun filled with marzipan and topped with whipped cream and powdered sugar. There are ...
steak tartare

Råbiff (Steak Tartare Swedish Style)

Who doesn't like steak tartare? A lot of people don't. But there are many of us who do, given that it's fresh. There's nothing worse than a questionable presentation of steak tartar. You know, the meat is raw, ...
schnitzel with green peas

Pork schnitzel

The Japanese call it "tonkatsu", the Italian call it "cotoletta milanese", the Austrians, Germans and Swedes call it schnitzel. You can call it whatever you want, but all the variations have one thing in common...
Swedish cardamom buns

Swedish cardamom buns

The kardemummabulle (Swedish cardamom buns) is as important to Swedes as the kanelbulle (Swedish cinnamon bun). All Swedes eat cake and drink coffee or tea. The event of doing this is called "fika", and is done...
Swedish Pyttipanna

Swedish pyttipanna

All countries have recipes that are based on leftovers. Italians have their frittata, Koreans have their bibimbap, the French make pain perdu (knows as French toast in the English speaking world), and Swedes ha...
salmon with pea purée

Glorious salmon with pea purée

”Lax med kokt potatis” means salmon with boiled potatoes. It’s quite popular in Sweden, and is often served with melted butter, potatoes boiled with dill, and boiled peas. This is a variation of it, and in my o...
Swedish chokladboll

Swedish chocolate balls with a touch of whisky

In a global world, Sweden has but traces of its culinary traditions left. All cultures evolve, and there's nothing bad about it, really. Sure people still eat falukorv, but I think pasta is far more popular. Wh...